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October 2005 Invasive Species Biographies 03-33

Program of Research on the
Economics of Invasive Species Management


October 20-21, Washington D.C.
Sponsored by USDA's Economic Research Service and Farm Foundation

Speaker Biographies

Wiktor Adamowicz is a Canada Research Chair (Environmental Economics) Professor in the Department of Rural Economy at the University of Alberta and an Adjunct Professor in the Department of Economics, University of Alberta. He has a Ph.D. from the University of Minnesota and B.Sc. and M.Sc. degrees from the University of Alberta. His research interests are in developing methods that integrate environmental goods and services into economic analysis and designing policies and institutions that help capture the importance of environmental services in economic decision-making. He has published on the topics of environmental valuation, forest management and biodiversity conservation, and consumer behavior and water resource problems.

Amit Batabyal is Arthur J. Gosnell Professor of Economics at the Rochester Institute of Technology. His research interests are in applied microeconomic theory and in natural resource and environmental economics. He has published over 350 journal articles, books, book chapters, and book reviews on various topics in the social sciences.

Mary Bohman is the Director of the Economic Research Service’s Resource and Rural Economics Division. She joined ERS in 1997 and has served as Deputy Director for Research of the Market and Trade Economics Division and Chief of the Europe, Africa, and Middle East Branch. Other positions held include details to the Office of Science and Technology Policy and Under Secretary for Farm and Foreign Agricultural Services, and faculty member in Agricultural Sciences at the University of British Columbia from 1990-1997. She received her Ph.D. from the Department of Agricultural Economics, University of California, Davis and her B.S. from the School of Foreign Service, Georgetown University.

Alan Burdick is the author of Out of Eden: An Odyssey of Ecological Invasion, published in May 2005 by Farrar Straus and Giroux, and a senior editor at Discover. He has also written for numerous publications including The New York Times Magazine, Harper's, GQ, and Natural History. He has worked as an editor at The New York Times Magazine and The Sciences, and was the editorial producer and senior writer for Science Bulletins, a multimedia science-news division of the American Museum of Natural History. Mr. Burdick graduated from Stanford University with a bachelor's degree in the history and philosophy of science.

Stan Daberkow is an agricultural economist with the Economic Research Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture. He received his Ph.D. from the University of California at Davis, a M.Sc. from Iowa State University, and a B.Sc. from the University of Nebraska. He is currently involved with ERS’s economic surveys and programs on invasive species, crop production practices, agricultural information technologies, and technology adoption.

Robert Dismukes is an economist in the Market and Trade Economics Division, Economic Research Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture. He has a M.Sc. in agricultural and resource economics from the University of Massachusetts at Amherst. His current research interests include farmer participation in crop insurance, the role of private companies in the delivery of crop insurance, and farm income variability and income stabilization policies.

Linda Fernandez is an Associate Professor of environmental and resource economics in the Department of Environmental Sciences at the University of California, Riverside. She received her Ph.D. from University of California, Berkeley. Her research areas include (1) economic evaluation of policy options to abate marine invasive species, (2) trade liberalization and transboundary air and water pollution, (3) cross media environmental regulations, and (4) economics of policies to address urban sprawl and protection of habitat such as wetlands and open space. Her research has been used by the trilateral Commission for Environmental Cooperation of North America.

Munisamy (Gopi) Gopinath
is an associate professor in the Department of Agricultural and Resources Economics at Oregon State University. He holds a Ph.D. in applied economics from the University of Minnesota. His research areas are agricultural productivity, trade and foreign direct investment. Prior to moving to Oregon State he worked at the Economic Research Service, USDA for two years.

Barry K. Goodwin is William Neal Reynolds Professor in the Departments of Economics and Agricultural and Resource Economics at North Carolina State University. In addition to NCSU, he has held faculty positions at Kansas State University and the Ohio State University. His teaching and research activities are focused in policy, risk management, trade, and statistics.

Jennifer L. Grannis is a Livestock and Animal Products Industry Analyst at the Center for Emerging Issues (CEI) of USDA’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) Veterinary Services (VS) in Fort Collins, Colorado. Her responsibilities focus on providing timely information to VS policy makers through economic evaluation of emerging animal industries, impacts of disease outbreaks and future activities. She received a Ph.D. and Masters in agricultural economics from Colorado State University.

Robert Griffin is the Director of the Plant Epidemiology and Risk Analysis Laboratory at the Center for Plant Health Science and Technology, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, USDA. He directs the work of a diverse team of scientists devoted to risk analyses that support risk-based decision-making for Plant Protection and Quarantine (PPQ) regulations and programs. He received a B.S. in biology from Northern Arizona University in 1975 and a M.S. in plant pathology from the University of Arizona in 1980.

Steve A. Halbrook is Vice President of the Farm Foundation. A native of Arkansas, he received in B.A. degree in economics from the University of Arkansas-Fayetteville and a Ph.D. in economics from Iowa State University. He took his legal training at Drake University School of Law in Des Moines, Iowa, and became a member of the District of Columbia Bar in 1979. Dr. Halbrook taught money and banking at Drake University, served as an economist for the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System and for USDA's Agricultural Marketing Service, and was staff executive vice president of the National Dairy Promotion and Research Board. Dr. Halbrook is a member of the American Agricultural Law Association, the American Agricultural Economics Association, and is president of the Chicago Agricultural Economists Club.

Rick Horan is an Associate Professor of Environmental and Natural Resource Economics in the Department of Agricultural Economics at Michigan State University. His research interests lie mainly in the co-evolution of economic and ecological systems, with a particular focus on the management of threatened and endangered species, and invasive species. Rick received a Ph.D. in agricultural economics from The Pennsylvania State University in 1997, and then went to work for the Economic Research Service where he focused on the economics of designing agricultural pollution control policies. He has been at Michigan State since 2000.

Terrance Hurley received his Ph.D. in economics from Iowa State University in 1995 and is currently an associate professor in the Department of Applied Economics at the University of Minnesota. His research interests include the management and regulation of biological resources where he has actively contributed to the debate regarding the Environmental Protection Agency's regulation of plant-incorporated-protectants like Bt corn. His research interests also include decision making under risk where he is using experimental methods to better understand the how risk preferences and risk perceptions shape behavior.

Brooks Kaiser is an assistant professor at Gettysburg College, Department of Economics. She received her Ph.D. from Northwestern University and has had a variety of visiting positions at the University of Hawaii since 1998. Her research focuses on environmental and natural resource issues including invasive species, forest and water management in Hawaii and analysis of the National Environmental Policy Act and the U.S. Forest Service. She also has an active research interest in economic history, particularly pertaining to public goods provision.

Michael J. Livingstonis with the Economic Research Service, USDA. He received a Ph.D. in economics from North Carolina State University in 1999. He has been an Assistant Professor at Texas Tech University in the Department of Agricultural and Applied Economics, a Post-Doctoral Research Associate in the Department of Entomology at North Carolina State University, a regulatory economist with USDA’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service. His research interest at ERS is in the economics and biology of invasive species management.

Sabrina Lovell is an economist at the Environmental Protection Agency’s National Center for Environmental Economics in Washington, DC. She has a Ph.D. in agricultural and resource economics from the University of California, Berkeley. Her current research interests include valuing the benefits of ecosystem services, land use and the environment, and the economic impacts of invasive species.

Lori Lynch is an associate professor in the Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics at the University of Maryland. She received her Ph.D. from University of California, Berkeley in 1996 and master's degree from University of California, Davis in 1989. She worked as an economist at the Economic Research Service of the United States Department of Agriculture between her masters and Ph.D. programs. With co-authors, she has published papers on exotic pests, on spatial transmission of plant diseases, cooperation versus regulation with respect to exotic pests, and the implications of different allocation strategies for spatially regulated chemicals. She is currently on sabbatical at ERS working on land values.

Carissa Marasas is an economist at USDA’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS). Her work addresses the economics of regulatory programs involving invasive species, plant and animal health, and natural resources and environmental concerns. She has a M.S. in plant pathology from the University of Stellenbosch and a Ph.D. in agricultural economics from the University of Pretoria in South Africa. Before joining APHIS, Carissa served as a researcher at the Agricultural Research Council in South Africa and the International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center in Mexico. Her research focused on the impact assessment of genetic improvement, plant health, and agricultural development programs. She also has contributed to teaching and advisory initiatives in various Southern African countries.

Kenneth H. Mathews, Jr. is an agricultural economist with the USDA’s Economic Research Service. His research interests include beef supply and demand analysis and animal disease issues. He received a B.S. from Texas A&M (wildlife management), M.S. from Texas Tech (agricultural economics), and Ph.D. from N.C. State (economics).

Bruce Maxwell is Professor of Agroecology/Weed Ecology in the Department of Land Resources and Environmental Science at Montana State University in Bozeman, Montana. He received his B.S. degree in botany and his M.S. degree in agronomy from Montana State University. He received a Ph.D. in forest ecology/crop science from Oregon State University in 1989. His research has focused on invasive forest shrub population dynamics, developing improved methods for quantifying weed interference in corn, modeling of herbicide resistance evolution in weeds and the application of ecological principles to pest management and land use planning. Bruce currently has one post-doctoral research scientist, two research technicians, and 4 graduate students working in his lab on various aspects of agroecology and ecologically based pest management. Bruce has published over 60 scientific journal articles and chapters in books and has been a member of two National Research Council Committees on Agriculture.

L. Joe Moffitt is a Professor and Outreach Coordinator in the Department of Resource Economics of the University of Massachusetts at Amherst. His research interests include the economics of crop protection with particular emphasis on new technology and biosecurity. He has a Ph.D. in agricultural and resource economics from the University of California, Berkeley.

John Mumford is professor of natural resource management in the Centre for Environmental Policy at Imperial College London. He comes from Massachusetts, has degrees in agriculture and applied entomology from Purdue University and Imperial College London, and has worked at universities in the U.S., New Zealand, and Great Britain. His research is at the interface of ecology and economics in area-wide pest management and eradication programs, biosecurity management, and environmental risk management in Africa, Australia, Asia, and Europe.

Wesley N. Musser is a Professor and Extension Specialist in the Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics at the University of Maryland, College Park. His general area of expertise is farm and financial management with a specific interest in risk management. He has a BS and MS from the University of Nebraska and a Ph.D. from the University of California, Berkeley. Previous positions have been at the Pennsylvania State University, Oregon State University, and the University of Georgia. He has had sabbaticals at the University of Minnesota and Purdue University and is currently on sabbatical at the Economic Research Service of USDA.

Douglas Neumann
is a senior conservation officer in the Office of Ecology and Terrestrial Conservation, Bureau of Oceans and International Environmental Scientific Affairs, U.S. Department of State. He has been the State Department policy liaison to the National Invasive Species Council for the past two years, and also handles other trade-related biodiversity issues. Mr. Neumann joined the Foreign Service in 1980 and has previously served in Germany, Brazil, Jordan, Saudi Arabia and Yemen.

Lars J. Olson is Professor in the Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics at the University of Maryland, College Park. He has served as Associate Editor and on the Editorial Council of the Journal of Environmental Economics and Management. His main research interests are in the area of natural resource and environmental economics, particularly problems involving the allocation of resources over time and under uncertainty.

James Opaluch is a professor of environmental economics and Director of the Policy Simulation Laboratory at the University of Rhode Island. He received a Ph.D. in agricultural and natural resource economics and Master’s degree in statistics both from the University of California, Berkeley. Dr. Opaluch has been actively involved in research on issues related to environmental policy for many years. Dr. Opaluch has served on a number of national panels and committees, including committees for the National Academy of Sciences, National Science Foundation, US Mineral Management Service, and the US Environmental Protection Agency Science Advisory Board.

Craig Osteen is co-leader of Economic Research Service's Program of Research on the Economics of Invasive Species Management extramural competitive awards program. He has worked at ERS for over 25 years, and is currently assigned to the Resource and Rural Economics Division. An important focus of his work with ERS has been the economics and policy of pesticide use and pest management, as well as invasive species management. Craig's academic background is in natural resource economics with a Ph.D. from Michigan State University.

Philip Paarlberg is a Professor in the Department of Agricultural Economics at Purdue University. He received his Ph.D. in agricultural economics from Purdue University. His research interests include the economic impacts of livestock disease outbreaks. Paarlberg's recent publications include "Measuring Welfare Effects of an FMD Outbreak in the United States" in the Journal of Agricultural and Applied Economics and "Potential Revenue Impact of an Outbreak of Foot-and-Mouth Disease in the United States" in the Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association. Paarlberg has had extensive experience in the Economic Research Service (ERS) from 1977-1985 where he analyzed international trade policy issues.

Nick Piggott
is an Associate Professor in the Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics at North Carolina State University. His research interests include agricultural marketing, demand analysis, international trade, risk management, and applied econometrics. He received his Ph.D. from the University of California, Davis in 1997.

Donna Roberts is a senior economist at the Economic Research Service of the U.S. Department of Agriculture. In 2002, she completed a six-year assignment at the US Trade Representative's Permanent Mission in Geneva, Switzerland, during which time she contributed to research projects sponsored by the National Research Council, the OECD, the World Bank, and the WTO. She has published numerous journal articles and book chapters on agricultural trade, trade policy, and trade regulation, and is co-author of Food Regulation and Trade: Toward a Safe and Open Global System (International Institute of Economics, 2004). Since 2003, she has served as co-director of ERS’s extramural competitive awards program, PREISM, which funds research on the economics of invasive species management. She is a Ph.D. candidate in agricultural and applied economics at the University of Minnesota and obtained her B.S. and M.S. degrees in agricultural economics from the University of Missouri.

James Roumasset is Professor of Economics at the University of Hawaii. He has been a assistant professor, visiting professor, scholar, and country director at the University of California, Davis, the University of Maryland, the Australian National University, Yale University and for the Agricultural Development Council and has worked extensively for USAID and the World Bank. He has published widely in the areas of decision-making under uncertainty, public economics, and resource and environmental economics.

James N. Sanchirico is a Fellow in the Quality of the Environment Division of Resources for the Future. His research primarily focuses on the economic analysis of fishery policy design, implementation, and performance, especially the effects of policies such as individual transferable quotas and marine protected areas. His other research interests include spatial and intertemporal management of biological resources, the interface between land use and water quality, and the economics of antibiotic resistance. He received his Ph.D. in agricultural and resource economics from University of California, Davis, 1998. In 2003-04, he was a Visiting Scholar at the Center for Environmental Science and Policy, Stanford University.

James Schaub is the Director of USDA's Office of Risk Assessment and Cost-Benefit Analysis (ORACBA). Prior to joining ORACBA he served as a senior economist in the USDA's Office of the Chief Economist, where his primary areas of responsibility were regulatory review and agricultural policy development with emphasis on food safety, international trade, and competition in the livestock sector. Before to joining the Office of the Chief Economist in 1991, Dr. Schaub served 12 years as a research economist with USDA's Economic Research Service. Dr. Schaub is a member of the Methyl Bromide Technical Options Committee of the United Nations Environmental Program. He holds a Ph.D. in economics from North Carolina State University.

David Simpson is an economist in EPA’s National Center for Environmental Economics. He has worked on a number of issues involving the economics of biodiversity and ecological resources and published widely on these and other topics. Simpson has consulted to several governments and nonprofit organizations and served as an adjunct instructor at several universities.

Rhonda Skaggs is a Professor in the Department of Agricultural Economics and Agricultural Business at New Mexico State University. She teaches courses in agricultural policy and agricultural issues. Her current research projects include analysis of irrigation practices in the Elephant Butte Irrigation District (as part of the Rio Grande Basin Initiative), attitudes toward agriculture, government, and the environment in New Mexico, U.S.-Mexico livestock trade, and the southwest region chile pepper industry. She has a B.S. and a M.S. from Colorado State University and a Ph.D. in Economics from Utah State University.

Daniel A. Sumner is the Frank H. Buck, Jr. Professor in the Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics at the University of California, Davis and the Director of the University of California, Agricultural Issues Center. He participates in research, teaching, and directs an outreach program related to public issues facing agriculture. His research and writing focuses particularly on the consequences of farm and trade policy on agriculture and the economy. Prior to his current position, Sumner was the Assistant Secretary for Economics at USDA where he was involved in policy formulation and analysis on issues facing agriculture and rural America. As Assistant Secretary he was the supervisor of USDA's economics and statistics agencies, responsible for data collection, outlook and economic research.

John Tschirhart, a native of New York, received his B.S. from Johns Hopkins University in 1970 and his M.S. and Ph.D. from Purdue University in 1972 and 1975, respectively. He is currently Professor of Economics at the University of Wyoming. He has published numerous articles on regulation of business, public finance and natural resources. He is co-editor with Jay Shogren of Protecting Endangered Species in the United States, published by Cambridge University Press, and of a special issue in Ecological Economics (February 2005) on invasive species. He is on the DIVERSITAS ecosystem services scientific committee and is developing general equilibrium models of ecosystems that can be integrated with economic models to better evaluate ecosystem services.

Utpal Vasavada is Chief of the Production Economics and Technology Branch in the Economic Research Service’s Resource and Rural Economics Division. The Branch serves as a focal point of ERS research on the economics of invasive species management, organic agriculture, agricultural biotechnology, agricultural land use, and database development through the Agricultural Resource Management Survey. Before joining ERS, Utpal worked at Laval University and the University of Georgia.

Thomas Wahl is the Director of the IMPACT Center and a Professor in the School of Economic Sciences at Washington State University. His research interests include international marketing and trade as well as food demand analysis. He has been associated with the IMPACT Center since 1990 with projects focusing on trade policy, including APEC, NAFTA and WTO, food demand in the Pacific Rim, world livestock and wheat trade and consumer attitudes towards GMOs and BSE (mad cow disease).

Lisa Wainger is an Associate Research Scientist at the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science. She received her Ph.D. in 1997 from the University of Maryland from an interdisciplinary program in which she linked spatial ecology and economic models to examine natural resource policy issues. As a project investigator, Dr. Wainger has applied GIS-based spatial data analyses, statistical models, and computer simulation models to evaluate changes in the relative value of natural systems due to alternative management actions.

 
       

 

 

 
   
 
 

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